How To Do A Term Paper

What is a term paper for you? Generally, it is a written assignment of reasonable length in which it is necessary to analyze and interpret the obtained information concerning a specific topic. In real life, it is a stressful and troublesome process, especially for dummies. Every semester college and high school students are required to prepare term papers on a research topic relevant to the subject covered in the class. Writing a concise text is the aim for many students as mediocre results cannot bring academic success. Want to take your term paper to the head of the class? Follow the simple steps of our guide and learn the peculiarities of preparation and creation of the term paper outline, introduction, body, and conclusion: 

Step1 Selection of a Topic

There are two possible situations: a professor gives you a topic or you have the opportunity to choose it on your own. Be specific. On the one hand, you may visit the school library and begin finding the sources. In the latter case, you have to brainstorm the ideas and take over the responsibility for choosing the proper theme. Take advantage of the situation in any situation. It is the most common problem to find a suitable topic as the decision may influence the whole working process. If you ignore this part of the assignment, the absence of the needed materials and inspiration will spoil the whole quality of your college term paper. Just ask yourself several questions:

  • Am I interested in the subject?

  • Which topic may be useful for me in future?

  • Does the topic fit the format?

  • Is the subject likely to be covered in articles and books?

Have you answered “YES” to at least three questions? It is proved that if a student is interested in the theme, the process flows quicker and the knowledge absorbs better. 

Step 2 Research Process

Once you’ve chosen the topic, it is high time to start the research. Every academic text should be organized according to the needed formatting style. Check the available samples of the similar papers on the Web and sit down to your work with a clear plan in your mind. Make a list of keywords that will be helpful for both online and offline searches and read fluently every article, journal or book related to the subject and take special notes from solid references. Look for information on your topic in the library, the major department, and other sources appropriate for it. 
Grab all the materials and get down to work in a quiet place where nothing can disturb you. Scholarly books contain information that is more specific while books are for a more general audience. Additionally, use reviews as they contain helpful references and leads to primary sources.  Write out the page where the passage you intend to quote takes place, note important statistics, proper names, and definitions. 

Step 3 Structure

How to draw up a term paper? It is needed to follow the simple structure that includes:

  • Title page

  • Contents

  • List of abbreviations

  • List of figures

  • Intro

  • Body

  • Conclusion 

  • References

  • Abstract

Talk to your instructor in order to know the exact text length for your assignment. Generally, it doesn’t exceed 3500 words or 8 – 10 pages. Indicate the name of your school, the name of the lecturer, title of your term paper, year/semester and contacts on the title page. What do you want to write about? 
Write a statement outlining the main peculiarities of the paper (prospectus). The guiding question and the argument why it is interesting should be presented in the introduction. Argue your points or answer the central question by providing with the needed evidence in the main section that can be subdivided into subchapters. The conclusion is the type of summary where you may support your point and answer the central question. Sometimes the question remains open and suggests points which deserve further research. 

Step 4 Write a Term Paper!

Organize the information you have gathered according to your outline and check it for reliability, currency, and accuracy. Don’t waste any minute and proceed to the writing process! Information that is not relevant to your topic or hard to your understanding should be removed. Be able to communicate your ideas, insights, and thoughts in your first draft. In this case, you can write fast without paying attention to the grammatical correctness of the text. Prepare everything for writing your well-organized term paper exactly as outlined. 

Step 5 Edit and Write a Final Paper

Doesn’t matter if you are working on the term paper in History or Engineering, the most pleasant and the most critical part of the whole process is writing a final draft. Read your rough draft written previously and analyze whether it captures the essence of your idea. Plagiarism is out of the question. If you followed the previous steps, your text must be unique. You should detect any content errors personally and with the help of special online grammar and proofreading checkers and reorganize your outline if necessary. Final paper with proper spelling, punctuation, and structure makes your term paper attractive and meet the requirements specified by your lecturer. Finally, before submitting your assignment ask yourself: "Is this the best version of the term paper that I can do?"

A term paper is a research paper written by students over an academic term, accounting for a large part of a grade. Term papers are generally intended to describe an event, a concept, or argue a point. It is a written original work discussing a topic in detail, usually several typed pages in length, and is often due at the end of a semester.

There is much overlap between the terms research paper and term paper. A term paper was originally a written assignment (usually a research based paper) that was due at the end of the "term"—either a semester or quarter, depending on which unit of measure a school used. However, not all term papers involve academic research, and not all research papers are term papers.

History[edit]

Term papers date back to the beginning of the 19th century when print could be reproduced cheaply and written texts of all types (reports, memoranda, specifications, and scholarly articles) could be easily produced and disseminated. Moulton and Holmes (2003) write that during the years from 1870 to 1900 "American education was transformed as writing became a method of discourse and research the hallmark of learning."[1]

Russell (1991) writes that in the 1910s, "the research paper began to harden into its familiar form" adding that plagiarism and the sale of research papers both became a problem during this time.[2]

Plagiarism in the computer era[edit]

See also: Essay mill

In the present day an entire industry has sprung up to provide plagiarized, pre-written or custom written term papers for students of varying levels of education. There are many websites that sell term papers of all levels of quality and writing proficiency, but are often claimed by academic institutions as seriously undermining the academic integrity of the student.[3] Also, plagiarism can be unknowingly committed by students.[4] Although plagiarism can be unknowingly committed it is quite a few steps that can be taken in order to avoid plagiarism. Some of the steps are quotation marks around the words or sentence that you take from a source. even if you list the source at the end of the paper be sure to mark exactly what sentence was taken from the source. Don't just count summarizing as changing a few words, that is still considered plagiarism. Actually take the time to read the content and summarize the main points of the source to how you understood the material without keeping the wording that was already used the same. Also be sure to always list your sources after putting the quote or summarization and also when providing your works cited.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

  1. ^Moulton, Margaret R. and Holmes, Vicki L (2003) "The Research Paper: A Historical Perspective," Teaching English in the Two Year College 30(4) p.366
  2. ^Russell, David R. Writing in the Academic Disciplines, 1870–1990: A Curricular History. Southern Illinois University, 1991. p.87-8
  3. ^"BBC NEWS | Education | Google bans essay writing adverts". news.bbc.co.uk. Retrieved 4 December 2016. 
  4. ^Crawford, Miki (29 September 2010). "Are You Committing Plagiarism? Top Five Overlooked Citations to Add to Your Course Materials". FacultyFocus.com. Retrieved 5 March 2015. 
  5. ^Anne,, Ackley, Katherine. Perspectives on contemporary issues : readings across the disciplines (Eighth edition ed.). Boston. ISBN 9781305969377. OCLC 967940184. 

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