Why There Should Be No Homework On Weekends

During the school year, weekends are the only time students can have free time to spend with their family and friends, unlike weekdays when students are piled on with loads of homework given by teachers. Students should not have homework on the weekends because it interferes with other obligations such as the time you can spend relaxing with family, resting, and studying the knowledge previously learned that week.

On a typical school night, a high school student spends around two hours, at a minimum each night on homework, according to a survey from directhit.com.  During weekdays students miss out on sleep, socializing, and crucial family time. If a person spends all their time doing homework Monday through Thursday, there should be a break on the weekend for time to catch up on things missed during the week.

During the week, children and family do not spend quality time together because of six hour school day, which is followed up by extracurricular activities and homework.  Parents too long forward to weekend, since they have jobs during the week that demands much of their own time.

Although some believe that homework creates bonding time between parents and students, since parents can aid in their child’s school work, many other parents believe that homework is stressful on kids, and when it comes to the weekend, that time should go towards strengthening the family connection, not doing homework.

Many students are involved in extracurricular activities, sports or even work hours on school nights. This causes students to get home from school late. Kids don’t usually start homework right away; they take care of other priorities first, pushing their homework further into the night.

“After I get home from volleyball, I go right into the shower and eat dinner with my family. By the time everything’s settled, I can’t usually start my hours of homework till 8:30 p.m,” said Danielle Montgomery.

Many other students are put into this situation also cutting down on crucial needed sleep during the week to do well in school the next day. By having this same routine every weekday, when the weekend finally arrives, a student is run down on energy and missing out on a lot of sleep. Knowing that they are free of homework on

those days brings a huge relief and allows them to finally rest and regain energy.

Being assigned loads of homework during a time that you could rest, does not allow you to do so.

Some people may say that with better time management, the student can get his or her homework done in the time needed to still allow a decent night’s sleep. If extra time is needed on an assignment, they can squeeze it in at lunch or even in another class that allows some free time.  When kids try to figure out how to get everything done, but fail, they get discouraged and their work ethic is affected. They have no choice but to stay up late into the evening making sure everything is done for the next day.

Another important argument is that students have other obligations such as church, Sunday school, or sporting events that if they have homework on the weekends, it would prevent them from attending any of them.

Some say this is a lesson that has to be learned, and gives good practice for

Future events, since an adult may be called into work, or have to finish something for a job on the weekends even though he or she has off. Having homework on the weekends as a teen helps you learn responsibility of when to choose work over other plans in the real world. Although it would be good practice for a kid, now isn’t the time to learn because they should enjoy their childhood while they still have it.

“No homework tonight!” From time to time, some teachers surprise their students with that announcement at the closing bell of class. In some schools, though, that’s becoming the norm rather than the exception—at least on specially designated weekends.

A Seasonal Gift for Some

Fall is the season to give thanks and be merry. It’s also the countdown to college admissions due dates. And it’s a great time to land a seasonal job and make some extra money at the end of the year. In states such as Maryland, several schools have designated homework-free weekend periods this fall. It allows over-stressed kids to catch up with other responsibilities—or simply take a breather. The main reason for the break, though, is that college priority and early admissions deadlines for many top colleges in the region occur in the fall.

Schools in Princeton, New Jersey, began implementing one homework-free weekend each semester in 2015, in part to give students more time to pursue interests and passions outside of school. Other New Jersey schools limit the number of minutes students should spend on homework each night. In Hinsdale, Illinois, one high school began offering seniors one homework-free weekend in October “to give harried seniors a little break to prepare for their futures . . . and make sure they have enough time to work on their college applications.” Similarly, schools across the country offer a no-homework weekend at year’s end.

Not Without Downsides

Unfortunately, homework-free weekends sometimes create an unwelcome side effect: extra-homework weekdays. Teachers are still tasked with finishing their lesson plans, and homework is often an important part of that. For students who are working on projects with pending due dates, not working on those projects for an entire weekend may not be feasible. And there’s always the risk that students who are afforded extra time to catch up on college admissions and pursue positive endeavors may simply waste the free time bestowed upon them.

Is homework helpful or harmful?

Some teachers and school districts have taken a blanket approach and banned homework entirely. The value of homework as a whole has been a topic of much debate. In one study, researchers at University of Virginia’s Curry School of Education concluded that math and science homework didn’t lead students to achieve better grades, but it did lead to better standardized test results.

A Stanford researcher concluded that excess homework increases kids’ stress and sleep deprivation. She emphasized that homework shouldn’t be assigned simply as a routine practice; it should have a concrete purpose and benefit. Homework, especially thoughtful homework, is valuable, and eliminating it entirely may be counterproductive to the goal of attending school in the first place: mastering the subject matter.

What do you think?

It’s a safe assumption that most students would strongly favor a homework-free-weekends policy. We’re curious how parents feel about the idea. How would you feel if your child’s school implemented a “no homework on the weekends” policy? Would you worry that your children might fall behind peers in other schools without a similar policy? Or do you think it would encourage your children to engage in more valuable extracurricular activities, get jobs, spend more time completing their college admissions packets, or simply catch up on much-needed sleep? We’d love to know what you think.

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